‘Fukushima: The Silent Voices’ London Premiere, Tuesday 21 February 2017

Tuesday 21 February 2017

Room 116, main building, SOAS (School of Oriental and African Studies), London WC1H OXG

‘Fukushima: The Silent Voices’, a film by Chiho Sato and Lucas Rue

19:00screening, followed by a Q&A with the directors

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more about the film here: https://fukushimathesilentvoices.wordpress.com/blog/

Poster for the SOAS, London screening:

fukushima-silent-voices-poster-2-web

 

A5 flyer pdf:

fukushima-silent-voices-soas-a5-flyer

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‘Fukushima: The Silent Voices’ London Premiere, Tuesday 21 February 2017

Statement to PM Shinzo Abe & Ambassador Keiichi Hayashi, 11.3.2016

Read out at the Remember Fukushima Vigil outside the Japanese Embassy London on 11 March 2016

Statement to:

Mr Shinzo Abe, Prime Minister of Japan

Mr Keiichi Hayashi, Ambassador of Japan to the United Kingdom

The decision last week to indict executives of Japan’s largest energy utility, Tokyo Electric Power Company, for their failure to prevent the meltdown of three reactors at Fukushima Daiichi is a major step forward for the people of Japan. The fact that this criminal prosecution is taking place at all is a vindication for the thousands of civilians and their dedicated lawyers who are challenging the nation’s largest power company and the establishment system. It is a devastating blow to the obsessively pro-nuclear Abe government, which is truly fearful of the effect the trial will have on nuclear policy and public opinion over the coming years.

Today we stand here in solidarity with the people of Fukushima and Japan to demand a nuclear-free society. Fukushima disasters are not over. The tragedy is still continuing. A similar accident could happen any time anywhere in the world. It is hard to understand how Japan can justify restarting its nuclear reactors and exporting nuclear technology after the Fukushima disaster. Suddenly during 6–8 April 2015, the monitoring posts in Minamisoma detected very high radioactivity.

We now know that a civil nuclear disaster results in devastation similar to a nuclear war. We have the right to live in a world free from this nuclear brutality. Governments have an obligation to protect their citizens and future generations. Children played no part in the policy which led to the disaster at Fukushima. Yet, it is the young and unborn who are the most vulnerable to radiation. They are the future. Nothing is more important than protecting them.

Nuclear power, even without accidents, inevitably creates permanent and deadly contamination. It damages or destroys people’s health, the eco-system and the environment. From uranium mining to nuclear waste, nuclear energy is incompatible with life. Radiation has assaulted people in Japan, UK and other parts of the world repeatedly. The genetic disease will be transmitted into the future generations.

We say, “Enough is enough!” The latest polling shows 59% of Japanese people oppose restarting nuclear reactors, including Sendai. The NRA decision ignores the majority opinion.

The people of Japan, still suffering the ongoing tragedy of Fukushima, understand that the NRA is not protecting the public but only the interests of an industry in crisis. Sendai reactors are now set to restart in July. But, there are more and more sings of volcanic activities in Kyushu which will force Sendai Nuclear Power Plant to be shut again soon.

Sendai, Ikata and Takahama may make headlines in Japan and elsewhere today as a step toward restarts, but it does not change that for an entire year and 10 months, as of 11 August 2015 Japan has been nuclear free.

This is in large part due to the commitment of the people of Japan who have taken to the streets to protest nuclear restarts, have fought and won in courts, have massively reduced energy demand, and rapidly expanded clean, renewable solar panels.

This is impressive leadership from the people which has advanced Japan’s future despite the determination of the Abe Government and dirty energy industries to drag Japan backward into the energy dark ages.

The people have proven their commitment to a clean energy future, and they’ve shown the world that it is possible. It is happening now.

For the sake of our children and future generations, this planet must be protected from deadly nuclear contamination. We, as world citizens, demand the Japanese government implements the following:-

  • Evacuate children and young people from contaminated areas.
  • Reinstate the pre-Fukushima radiation safety standards.
  • Provide uncontaminated water and food to all children and young people.
  • Give free and prompt medical checks and treatments for all those exposed to Fukushima radiation.
  • Monitor contamination accurately and publicise the data immediately.
  • Stop futile and costly decontamination projects.
  • End the state myth that radiation below the so-called “safety” limit is safe.
  • Stop suppressing radiation-related health data and statistics.
  • Abolish nuclear energy and switch to renewables.
  • Abandon nuclear fuel recycling.
  • Stop exporting nuclear power and technology.
  • Disclose up-to-date information on the state of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.
  • Take responsibility for decommissioning Fukushima reactors.
  • Prosecute those responsible for the Fukushima nuclear catastrophe.
  • Protect the civil rights of anti-nuclear and anti-radiation citizens.
  • Respect freedom of expression and speech.
  • Comply with Japan’s ‘No-Nuclear weapon principles’.
  • Uphold the Peace Constitution. The article 9 should be kept as it is without expanding interpretation for more military action overseas.

Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Fukushima – Japan should share the lessons of these tragedies with the international community, and lead the world towards a nuclear-free future. Remember Fukushima – No to nuclear power! No to restart of Sendai, Ikata and Takahama.

Saikado Hantai. Saikado Hantai, Saikado Hantai, 再稼働反対!再稼働反対!再稼働反対! No to restart of Nuclear Reactors!!

Shigeo Kobayashi on behalf of Japanese Against Nuclear UK

Reverend Gyoro Nagase on behalf of Nipponzan Myohoji

Rik Grafit-Mottram on behalf of Kick Nuclear

Professor Dave Webb, Chairman, Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament

Dr Kate Hudson, General Secretary, Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament

Statement to PM Shinzo Abe & Ambassador Keiichi Hayashi, 11.3.2016

The Question of “Trust” by Dr Ian Fairlie

The Question of “trust” 
an extract from TORCH-2016 by Dr. Ian Fairlie, commissioned by Global 2000 and Friends of the Earth Austria, published 7th March 2016.
 
In 2005 the IAEA/WHO stated: 
 
“What the Chernobyl disaster has clearly demonstrated is the central role of information and how it is communicated in the aftermath of radiation or toxicological incidents. Nuclear activities in Western countries have also tended to be shrouded in secrecy. The Chernobyl experience has raised the awareness among disaster planners and health authorities that the dissemination of timely and accurate information by trusted leaders is of the greatest importance.” 
 
While this statement is undoubtedly correct, it raises the vexed question of public trust in governments and international agencies which for many people does not exist after Chernobyl and Fukushima.
 
To re-establish that trust will be difficult. At a minimum, it will require the following to happen:
 
First, for concerned governments to make clear to their citizens that they will consider safer energy options that do not have the potential for another Chernobyl or Fukushima. 
 
Second, for a dialogue to be created between agencies such as IARC, IAEA, WHO and national governments on the one hand and various NGOs/health charities on the other to enable exchanges of views on radiation risks and energy policies. Unfortunately, no such dialogue exists at present. 
 
Third, WHO should no longer be required to have its reports on radiation matters vetted by the IAEA, as presently required under the 1959 agreement between the two UN agencies.http://independentwho.org/en/who-and-aiea-aggreement/ 
 
Fourth, UN agencies in this area, IARC,WHO, UNSCEAR, IAEA should be required to have independent scientists from NGOs and health charities as members of their main Committees. This does not occur at present. Also these agencies should be required to consult on their draft reports, including the convening of meetings with environment NGOs and independent health charities. This also does not occur at present.
 
In addition to providing timely and accurate information, government health authorities and disaster planners need to improve their preparedness for future accidents by means of the following:- 
 
  • providing stable iodine to all citizens within at least 50 km of all nuclear reactors 
  • pre-stocking emergency levels of clean water supplies, long-life milk and dried food supplies 
  • distributing information leaflets to the public explaining what to do in the event of an emergency and explaining why precautionary measures are necessary 
  • detailed planning of possible evacuations 
  • constructing and staffing permanent emergency evacuation centres 
  • carrying out emergency evacuation drills 
  • planning subsequent support of evacuated populations 
  • planning how to help those who choose to remain in contaminated areas 
  • increasing the mental health training of primary physicians and nurses 
  • moving the site of care to primary care settings, and 
  • informing citizens that these measures have been taken 

It may be argued that these measures are unnecessary and/or too expensive. However TORCH 2016 shows that they are indeed necessary. Governments which choose to promote potentially dangerous energy policies should also fund the necessary precautions in case of accidents.

The Question of “Trust” by Dr Ian Fairlie